Monthly Archives: March 2010

Today’s word is ‘Mutualisation’

One of the best examples of leveraging the enthusiasm and social conscience of the crowd was The Guardian’s use of its readers to scrutinise the mountain of documentation produced by investigations into MP’s expenses. Twenty six thousand amateur investigative reporters went through 22,000 documents in a matter of days. The Guardian’s editor, Alan Rusbridger, describes this process [...]

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Nestle learns a tough lesson

Good write-up of the Nestle v Greenpeace story in Communicate magazine, which underlines some critical points for any corporate handling a social media-driven issue: Blocking or deleting content you don’t like is invariably counter-productive, no matter what the lawyers say … people will still find the content & it makes you look even more devious The [...]

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YouTube and Industrial Relations

In Crowd Surfing we described how internet based campaigns were increasingly replacing walk-outs and strike action as the trade union movement’s preferred form of direct action.  Employers have also begun to adopt this approach of appealing directly to their target audience, without relying on the editorial filter imposed by the traditional media.  BA’s Willie Walsh [...]

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Cider Power II

When a company reverts to an original product formulation within a year of unveiling a new recipe, you know that someone, somewhere has messed-up big time.  Last April, Gaymers  decided to reduce the alcohol content of its Blackthorn cider, unleashing the Wankthorn protest across the West Country … Facebook groups were formed, posters defaced and bearded men [...]

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The end of the professional critic

Another perfect illustration of how consumer empowerment is steadily eroding traditional sources of expertise … this time from the world of the theatre.  Sir Andrew Lloyd-Webber has expressed much frustration about how his new musical, Love Never Dies, is being undermined by the comments and reviews of amateur critics on the internet.  The professional critics – [...]

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Corporate Affairs Director R.I.P.

In the dreaded vernacular of government, the corporate affairs or corporate communications role within most major institutions is no longer fit for purpose.  Predicated on the illusion of control – the idea that a corporate reputation can be protected by tight news management and the careful nurturing of a handful of key opinion formers – [...]

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Information is Power

An interesting suggestion from Alan Mitchell in his Marketing column about how businesses can strengthen relationships with customers by handing back the data they already hold about a customers’ choices – what he calls Personal informatics.  Amazon and other online suppliers already provide a summary of our transaction history, accompanied by helpful suggestions about what we might [...]

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